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Winamp 5.552 Build 2458 + KeyGen

Winamp 5.552 Build 2458 + KeyGen

Winamp - is the most popular media to date. The program allows you to work with files in the formats MP3, OGG, AAC, WAV, MOD, XM, S3M, IT, MIDI, etc., supports video (AVI, ASF, MPEG, NSV), has a large number of settings and parameters capable of changing skin, has a good visualization module, a med

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Nanomagical Material Can Make Nuclear Reactors Safer

Nanomagical Material Can Make Nuclear Reactors Safer

Fighting cancer or making nuclear reactors that constantly self-repair themselves, helping to avoid the possibility of another Chernobyl. Clearly, nanotechnology will either save Earth or convert us into Borgs. Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists are betting on the first option. Their ne

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Why Alcohol Is Good For You

Why Alcohol Is Good For You

It's one of those medical anomalies that nobody can really explain: Longitudinal studies have consistently shown that people who don't consume any alcohol at all tend to die before people who do. At first glance, this makes little sense. Why would ingesting a psychoactive toxin that increases our

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Wrist-Worn, Flexible OLED Out in the Wild

Wrist-Worn, Flexible OLED Out in the Wild

The Universal Display Corporation (UDC) have themselves a wrist-worn, flexible OLED prototype that they built with support from the US Department of Defense. As you can see, the 4-inch screen looks a bit too unwieldy for practical use in the field, but the UDC believes that this technology wil

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Lenovo IdeaCentre 600: Thinnest (Hottest?) All-in-One PC on the Block

Lenovo IdeaCentre 600: Thinnest (Hottest?) All-in-One PC on the Block

Lenovo's IdeaCentre 600 is a pretty splashy debut: Its first ever all-in-one is a simple curved slab that's supposedly the thinnest all-in-one in the industry. Beyond the form factor—which borrows liberally from the new Star Trek and the iMac (the frameless black bezel looks like it was copy

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Disposable Paper Laptops

Disposable Paper Laptops

I quite agree with Je Sung Park when he says that disposable cameras and cell phones have gained acceptance, so why don’t we take the next step and bring out a disposable computer. His Recyclable Paper Laptop is quite a raw version and could do with some refinement. It uses recycled paper or pul

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HTC Rosie Screenshots

HTC Rosie Screenshots

Main Screen: We’ve seen the videos from Haykuro’s HTC Hero ROM and apparently the brand new UI is called “Rosie”. The upcoming June 24th HTC Event flyer shows a hipster laying in the grass with a rose laying on his chest, further proof that the issue at hand will be the announcement of the

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Twitter gets hacked...again

Twitter gets hacked...again

Over the Easter weekend, Twitter fell victim to yet another attack against the micro-blogging service. This time the attacker was 17 year old Mikeyy Mooney, who claims full responsibility for the attack, saying "I am aware of the attack and yes I am behind this attack". The attack was harmless in a

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Scratched Glasses Give Perfect Vision For Any Eyesight

Scratched Glasses Give Perfect Vision For Any Eyesight

Ditch those bifocals. You might soon wearing spectacles whose lenses allow you to see clearly regardless of how long or short-sighted you are.

With age, the lenses in our eyes often lose the ability to change shape enough to focus light from near objects onto the retina – a condition called presbyopia. This leaves people who were already short-sighted unable to focus on either near or distant objects. Bifocals offer a solution by having two lenses in the same frame, but users must get used to tilting their head up or down to switch focus.

Zeev Zalevsky at Bar-Ilan University in Ramat Gan, Israel, has developed a technique to turn a standard lens into one that perfectly focuses light from anything between 33 centimetres away and the horizon.

It involves engraving the surface of a standard lens with a grid of 25 near-circular structures each 2 millimetres across and containing two concentric rings. The engraved rings are just a few hundred micrometres wide and a micrometre deep. “The exact number and size of the sets will change from one lens to another,” depending on its size and shape, says Zalevsky.

The rings shift the phase of the light waves passing through the lens, leading to patterns of both constructive and destructive interference. Using a computer model to calculate how changes in the diameter and position of the rings alter the pattern, Zalevsky came up with a design that creates a channel of constructive interference perpendicular to the lens through each of the 25 structures. Within these channels, light from both near and distant objects is in perfect focus.

“It results in an axial channel of focused light, not a single focal spot,” Zalevsky says. “If the retina is positioned anywhere along this channel, it will always see objects in focus.”

Zalevsky has fitted one of his lenses to a cellphone camera to confirm the extended focus effect, and he has also tested the lenses on 12 volunteers (Optics Letters, vol 35, p 3066). He has now co-founded a company, Xceed Imaging, to develop the technology.

The approach is not without its problems, though: the interference pattern tends to cancel out some of the light passing through the lens, which reduces the contrast of images viewed through it. Pablo Artal of the University of Murcia, Spain, warns that if the contrast reduction becomes too large, the brain will struggle to interpret the information.

Zalevsky counters that people wearing the lenses do not notice a loss in contrast because the eye is very sensitive to light at low intensity. “Unlike a camera, the brain has a logarithmic and not linear [response to light].” He says that the brain adapts to and minimises the reduced contrast within a few seconds.

This is not the only way in which the brain must adapt to the new lenses. Fixed in a pair of glasses, the lenses would not move as the eye looked in different directions, so the focusing effect would be lost in the regions between the circles. But Zalevsky says that the eye learns to fill in the gaps as it moves from one engraved structure to another, generating a continuous effect.

Scratched Glasses Give Perfect Vision For Any Eyesight New Scientist reports, explores and interprets the results of human endeavour set in the context of society and culture, providing comprehensive coverage of science and technology news.

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